It's modern ammo and most gun shops have it. These used ammo common to the gew98s that Turkey was also given. Schilling, Suhl and the manufacture year of 1892. It has long been believed that single-stage muzzle ears allow mounting only to the 8 mm. Has been through Turkey, as evident by the half moon on the receiver, that is the only one I found on the rifle. Some of what appear to be single-stage muzzle ears are actually a simplified oval that allows mounting to both the Gewehr 88 and Gewehr 98. It was made at the Danzig Arsenal, located on the Baltic Sea in what is today Gdańsk Poland, in 1890. The Karabiner 88 utilized a different bolt handle, which resembled those found on commercial sporting rifles. This rifle began life as a German Gewehr 88 rifle in German military service. mark "neue materiel" ). [12], China also used this rifle extensively during the Qing dynasty and the Republican era. Gewehr 88 rifles were also used in the Spanish Civil War by both sides. A large number of the Gew 88/05s are as issued in Germany, acceptance marked and were never converted. Previous. Next is the 'Z' marking on the top of the receiver, which I believe means a rebarreling around 1896 (correct me if I'm … The Gew 88 was eventually superseded by the excellent Gewehr 98 which proved a substantial upgrade over the Commission Rifle - considered the pinnacle of Mauser bolt-action rifles - and saw extensive service throughout World War 1 and World War 2 as a standard German Army service rifle. [no citation] The Turks issued these and updated versions at least as late as the 1930s. These are found on a 1890 Spandau produced GEW 88. (Gewehr 88, 1905 S mod, 1935 Turkish mod). Aid. M1888 rifle, its rifling, and suitability of ammo. So I recently found a Gewehr 88 commission rifle (not Turkish) and I thought I would post pictures of it as I have some questions about the gun. older than 1897 (100 plus years) and built in the early years of smokeless powder As time went on, many of these Ersatz style bayonets were given to Turkish forces (who shortened them a 10 inch blade) and the Germans received regulation bayonets. This is a good example of the iconic German Gewehr 1888 "Commission Rifle", also known as the Gewehr 88, or GEW 88. I … 1916 Spandau Stern Gewehr 1916 DWM Gewehr 98. Many of the Gewehr 88-rifles were produced by the armament manufacturer Loewe & Company, whose chairman was Jewish entrepreneur Isidor Loewe. Manufactured in 1917. The maximum operating pressure for the Gewehr 88 commission rifle is less than that of any 8 mm Mauser rifle, as the makers of the Gewehr 88 did not fully understand the greater energy of smokeless powder compared to black powder. Many thousands of Gew 88’s were given to Germany’s World War One ally, Turkey, and almost all of the Gew 88’s seen in the USA are “Turks” with appropriate markings and some minor modifications to make them compatible with the “S” bore ammunition and stripper … Up for sale, a very rare Imperial German Gewehr 88 Muzzle Cover. This one has seen military service from the late 1800's thru WW1 and beyond. It was sent to Ethiopia, marked in Amharic, and then at some point cut down to carbine length. The following information on the Gewehr 88 Carbine comes from Chapter 12 of Mauser Rifles and Pistols by W. H. B. Smith. In response the German Army's Rifle Testing Commission developed the Gewehr 88 which was adopted for service in 1888. and has a .321 projectile to boot), or handload with either .321 or Cast lead bullets Original Item: Only one Available. has led to many confused and ill informed statements regarding the Commission or with some Turkish markings. The Republic of China also used this rifle extensively in the Republican era, but locally built models proved to be hopelessly defective and were quickly phased out. Thirdly, as an interim measure, the Germans themselves modified the barrels of the [1] This rechambering required more work as the 7.92×57mm Mauser chambering required a wider chamber throat to take the thicker brass of the new 1903 pattern cartridge. and the Bore of the new barrels for the Gew98 was fitted with .322-323 Grooves. 98 parts with K. Kale's, but it doesn't seem to be that common since the Gew.98s seem to have been rebuilt before the K.Kale's were produced. Blade front and tangent rear sights, with the 1917 date and arsenal markings on top of the chamber. Barrel bands are unit marked for WW1 service with reserve troops and later sold to Turkey for military use and has Turkish markings on the bolt. The rifle then and then saw long service, as indicated by the large … The Gew 88 was eventually superseded by the excellent Gewehr 98 which proved a substantial upgrade over the Commission Rifle - considered the pinnacle of Mauser bolt-action rifles - and saw extensive service throughout World War 1 and World War 2 as a standard German Army service rifle. Every combat rifle was designed to use the weapon of last resort, the bayonet. Next >> Usage conditions apply. Russian Berdan II Rifle caliber 10.75×58 mmR Our Price: $499.99 (Out of Stock) As shots are fired the clip remains in place until the last round is chambered, at which point it drops through a hole in the bottom of the rifle. Danzig 1890 Gewehr 88 Bolt Action Rifle Danzig 1890 Gewehr 88 Bolt Action Rifle. Russian Berdan II Rifle caliber 10.75×58 mmR Our Price: $499.99 (Out of Stock) The Gewehr could become a liability in such combat. save. Gewehr 88 rifles have been used widely during post World War I revolutions, uprisings and wars (usually on both sides of the Russian Civil War, the German Revolution of 1918–19, the Revolutions and interventions in Hungary (1918–20), the Greater Poland Uprising (1918–19), the Silesian Uprisings, the Turkish War of Independence, the Polish–Soviet War,[7] by the Ulster Volunteers and by Lithuanians in the Lithuanian Wars of Independence). The practical result was that the French rifle had greater accuracy and range, giving French troops a tactical advantage over the German Army. IIIF provides researchers rich metadata and media viewing options for comparison of works across cultural heritage collections. This motley looking group of Landsturm have been issued a variety of different headgear, including a mixture of Pickelhauben, with and without cloth covers and oil cloth caps. Antique German Gew 88/05 1888 Commission Rifle. This made Germany’s rifle, the Mauser Model 1871, obsolete due to its large and slow 11 mm round. Metadata. 7.92×57mm Mauser adapted rifles have the receiver marked with a large "S" rollmark. They are barely any markings on it though (proof marks, stamps of the army that used the gun etc. This is a good example of the iconic German Gewehr 1888 "Commission Rifle", also known as the Gewehr 88, or GEW 88. As time went on, many of these Ersatz style bayonets were given to Turkish forces (who shortened them a 10 inch blade) and the Germans received regulation bayonets. ... but the Gewehr 88 was not a fully Mauser-designed and … America). Gewehr 88/05 rifles were also used by Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia, mostly ones that were captured from German forces in World War II. that tiny W with a crown on it. The rifle then and then saw long service, as indicated by the large number of different markings on the gun. report. At the time of adoption, the M/88 "Patrone 7.9 mm" was loaded with a 14.6 g (226 gr) round nose bullet that measured 8.08 mm (.318 in) in diameter. This was noted by marking Post by ffuries » Sun Aug 12, 2012 1:03 am Found a stray homless 1890 Danzig Gew 88 at the local gun show today, that followed me home. Gewehr 88 Experts Needed! Isidor Loewe also held a controlling interest in the Waffenfabrik Mauser. The second one is of the butt plate and is L\RHXZ\C4\M. (Early G88 had a groove depth of 0.1 mm which was deepened to 0.15 mm LONG before introduction of the S bullet.) ), which I would expect from a military rifle. In good looking condition and maker marked from the Danzig Arsenals in 1889. The Gewehr 88 (commonly called the Model 1888 commission rifle) was a late 19th-century German bolt action rifle, adopted in 1888.. Mauser Rifles and Pistols is also available to purchase in print. After the start of World War 1, some of the remaining Gewehr 88 S rifles were modified to the Gewehr 88/14 standard, which was generally similar to Gewehr 88/05 but with cruder workmanship. It was made at the Danzig Arsenal, located on the Baltic Sea in what is today Gdańsk Poland, in 1890. feed system was converted to a Stripper clip system, by a modification of the magazine, Advice for use of any Gew88 type rifle, refurbished or not. The commission simply used Mauser's magazine design. This rifle began life as a German Gewehr 88 rifle in German military service. According to Ahlwardt's claims, Loewe would either deliberately supply the German army with insufficient rifles, or, along with other Jews, secretly exchange rifles with flawed ones after they had passed the reliability tests. Gewehr 1888 ‘Commission Rifle’ German Troops in their 'Schützengraben’ or trench. While not a guarantee of a Gew.98, the presence of lots of original Gew.98 parts is normal. Markings Since this weapon underwent several changes, the only original Gew 88/05 parts are the receiver, the bolt, the rear sight and the magazine/trigger assembly. The Gewehr 88 was also sometimes made into very elegant sporting rifles by gunsmiths in Germany. Some of them were modified to use the stripper clips used with the Gewehr 98 by milling a slot into the left side of the action and adding stripper clip guides on the top of the receiver. [1] The rifle was one of many weapons in the arms race between the Germanic states and France, and with Europe in general. The Spitzer Bullet had less bearing surface (about 35% of that of the M88 Cylindrical In response the German Army’s Rifle Testing Commission developed the Gewehr 88 whic… The first step was to select a new cartridge. Gewehr 88/05 rifles were also used by Yugoslavia,[5] Czechoslovakia, (for example as modified guard shotgun)[6] or Poland. The following information on the Gewehr 88 Carbine comes from Chapter 12 of Mauser Rifles and Pistols by W. H. B. Smith. By late 1914, the total war of World War I had begun to ravage Europe with an all-consuming ferocity that would last for four years. 6. The Gewehr 43 was put into production in October 1943, and followed in 1944 by the Karabiner 43 (K43), which was identical to the G43 in every way save for the letter stamped on the side. The invention of smokeless powder in the late 19th century immediately rendered all of the large-bore black powder rifles then in use obsolete. These two markings were stamped on various individual parts depending on when and in which factory the rifle was manufactured. My ’88 carbine is marked with the name V.C. Ahlwardt accused Loewe of being a spy for France, and denounced the rifle as a Judenflinte ("Jews' musket"). Smooth pistol grip stock, with a matching serial number on the underside, "crown/Gothic letter" proofs and a smooth flat buttplate. The practical result was that the French rifle had greater accuracy and range, giving French troops a tactical advantage over the German Army. Thanks, 470439470440 Dean For this reason the Gewehr 88 is also known as the "commission rifle," or "reichsgewehr". It should be possible to mix Gew. The exception to this rule is the “Stern Gewehr” with a Star marked receiver. ammo. In 1903-04, the new "S" Patrone (Spitzer, .323 Bullet) was introduced, When the .323 S bullet was introduced, the Gewehr 98 had (and kept) the same land-to-land and groove-to-groove diameter as the Gewehr 88 of late productions. (1905 "S" Bullet); this was done at the same time that the Packet clip This cover has the regimental markings stamped on the front of the cover. Barrel bands are unit marked for WW1 service with reserve troops and later sold to Turkey for military use and has Turkish markings on the bolt. Many thousands of Gew 88’s were given to Germany’s World War One ally, Turkey, and almost all of the Gew 88’s seen in the USA are “Turks” with appropriate markings and some minor modifications to make them compatible with the “S” bore ammunition and stripper … They are 29.RR.8.30. Additionally, both the ejector and the extractor that are attached to the bolt head are prone to falling out if care is not taken during disassembly and reassembly. LSB#: 141031MD50 Make: German Model: Commercial Variant of the Gewehr 88 (Gew 88 or Model 1888 Commission Rifle) Serial Number: 749 Year of Manufacture: 1888- 1914 Caliber: Pattern 1888 (round nose) 8mm Mauser Action Type: Bolt Action, Clip Fed Fixed Magazine Markings: There is no visible import mark. [14] These were likely intended for sale in South America, where use of the 7×57mm cartridge was widespread. I reload my own, so I don't know what it's costing these days. This Commission Rifle was made in Germany by Amberg in Germany. Gewehr 1888 ‘Commission Rifle’ German Troops in their 'Schützengraben’ or trench. [8] At the beginning of World War II some Gewehr 88 rifles were still in use, by second line units or paramilitary organizations (or partisans) in Poland[9] and Yugoslavia. Three forms of carbines were made in quantity in the Model 1888. It was designed by a group of officers from the GPK (GewehrPrufungsKomission) or Rifle Testing Commission of the German Army located in the city of Spandau. ammo nomenclature, wrongfully adopted by lazy Americans back in the early 1900s the Barrels "Z" (for "Zuge" meaning modified rifling); Previous. In 1903, the Germany Army adopted a … It was a superior replacement using the same ammunition with a stronger powder charge. Chamber markings on a commercially manufactured Gew98 will have the name of the commercial firm and the date the rifle was made. Thought some of you would enjoy the photos and let us know what all the markings mean. Accordingly, the Gewehr 88/05 was born. After these claims were found insupportable, Ahlwardt was sentenced to 4 months in prison for malicious falsehood.[2][3]. KAR 88 (Carbine 88) Antique German Imperial Carbine NO FFL Required Our Price: $499.99 (Out of Stock) Enfield NO 1 MK 3 Cal. Treat the old ladies with care and consideration, hide. Turks, who put in a new, correct, 7,9x57 barrel ( one that has a .323 groove diameter). Gewehr 88/05, Gewehr 88/14, Karabiner 88, With m/88 620 m/s (2066 fps), 8mm Mauser 868 m/s (2847 fps), This page was last edited on 5 November 2020, at 01:58. 13 in stock! The rifle was adopted during a period of rapid development in firearms technology, and marked Germany's shift to a smokeless powder. In 1898 a Mauser design was adopted, the Gewehr 98, which was the culmination of a series of Mauser models in the 1890s. Through this slot projects a bar which retains the cartridges in place against the magazine spring's pressure. Gew 88 markings? 13 in stock! Posted by 2 hours ago. High performance and hence high pressure or military ammunition designated for machine gun use cannot be fired safely in a Gewehr 88 commission rifle. given their advanced age. round nose). Gew 88 markings? Mauser Gewehr 98. A few are encountered with Finnish markings. Origins of My Gew 88 RifleThe original rifle had it’s beginnings as a German Commission rifle sometime prior to 1888 known as the Gewehr 88. The German Ersatz (substitute) type Bayonets were constructed during the early years of WWI and were designed to fit both the Gewehr 88 (M1888 Commission Rifle) and Gewehr 98 (M98 Mauser Gewehr 98) German rifles. Gewehr 88 Experts Needed! The Turks did rebuild most of them in the 30's but some are available in the original configuration with some Turkish markings. There is also Imperial German stamps on the top of the steel parts. Some early models had flaws due to rushed ammunition production. in Fractur script), Early trials found that the excessive friction of the long cylindrical bullet and The German Ersatz (substitute) type Bayonets were constructed during the early years of WWI and were designed to fit both the Gewehr 88 (M1888 Commission Rifle) and Gewehr 98 (M98 Mauser Gewehr 98) German rifles. Schilling, Suhl and the manufacture year of 1892. 13 comments. A large percentage of the mismatched bolts are due to the importers who removed the bolts to ship the rifles in bulk. 303 British Original. The barrel design and rifling were virtually copied from the French Lebel. Gew88 rifle from .321 grooves to a long barrel lead (or throating) to accept .323 About 5,500 Gewehr and Karabiner 88s were delivered to the Lithuanian Army in 1919–1920 (granted by Germany and sold by France and the UK). Can anyone determine what the unit markings in the attached photos are. This explains why its period as the primary German service rifle was just over a dozen years, but it remained in limited service for much longer. The invention of smokeless powder in the late 19th century immediately rendered all of the large-bore black powder rifles then in use obsolete. Original Item: Only one Available. Default Gewehr 88 unit markings to ID. Pictures Added! The single column magazine is the first clue that you have a Gew.88. This cover is in very nice shape. From 1905 the rifles were also converted to use the Gewehr 98 type stripper clip by adding stripper clip guides to the top rear of the receiver and altering the magazine becoming Gewehr 88/05 rifles. With these modifications the newer design remained in use until the end of World War II. The Republic of China also used this rifle extensively in the Republican era, in the guise of the Hanyang 88. Don't know what to make of the few markings that are seen on the pics (e.g. with reduced loads. Examples of these usually show first-class workmanship and special features such as folding sights and altered bolt handles. It was manufactured at the Amberg Arsenal, located in Bavaria, and first saw use with a regiment in the Bavarian Army. to take the German "S" Patrone 7,9mm; The gew88/05 in stock began to be converted, either by fitting new barrels, and In good looking condition and maker marked from the Danzig Arsenals in 1889. (Early G88 had a groove depth of 0.1 mm which was deepened to 0.15 mm LONG before introduction of the S bullet.) Although the packet loading system proved to be a design shortcoming, it is not uncommon to encounter a Gewehr 88 today which still retains it. Several thousands of Gewehr 88's were given to Turkey for combat use during WWI. At the time of adoption, the M/88 "Patrone 7.9 mm" was loaded with a 14.6 g (226 gr) round nose bullet that measured 8.08 mm (.318 in) in diameter. The Republic of China also used this rifle extensively in the Republican era, but locally built models proved to be hopelessly defective and were quickly phased out. Many Gewehr 88 rifles stayed in active service in second-line units, reserves, and in armies allied with the Germans through and well past World War I. The same 29.1in (0.74m) rifled barrel was used on both designs as was the bolt action mechanism and stock. The Gewehr 98 (abbreviated G98, Gew 98 or M98) is a German bolt action Mauser rifle firing cartridges from a 5 round internal clip-loaded magazine that was the German service rifle from 1898 to 1935, when it was replaced by the Karabiner 98k. This was used in 1892 by the then notorious anti-Semitic agitator Hermann Ahlwardt, member of the German Reichstag, to spread an anti-semitic conspiracy theory. Unlike many rifles designed later, the bolt head of this rifle is able to be removed from the bolt body. Mauser Rifles and Pistols is also available to purchase in print. Original Item: Only one Available. Antique German Gew 88/05 1888 Commission Rifle. Some Karabiner 88 carbines are known to have been produced in 7×57mm Mauser instead of the usual M/88 or the 7.92×57mm Mauser chambering. In the beginning of the 20th century China bought for a second time a large number of original Gewehr 88 rifles. The commission rifle's bolt action design was a commission modified Mauser action. at the same time, new steel was adopted for the receiver and barrel ("nm"